Lifestyle

In 3D - Tributes to Dexter Pottinger - Pt. 1

Sunday, October 08, 2017

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My oldest memory of Dexter was when he was about 11 years old. He had put on a fashion show in the middle of the street with all the community girls, in the area where he grew up. All the outfits were made out of newspaper. Then there was his winning Avant Garde Designer of the Year competing in his second year as a designer, all the while transitioning from a model to everything he was today. Another recollection is of him buying a tool box as a styling kit in True Value. He started styling around the island alongside myself, Saint International models, Jamaican beauties, and shooting with Peter Dean Rickards. A lot of his work was featured in the international press and won awards. These were also seen in the Biennial 2017 at The National Gallery of Jamaica in the Peter Dean Rickards tribute. Dexter also worked his way up from model to designer to stylist to hair to make-up. He became a one-man show, not having to rely on others. This led him to work with names such as Beyoncé and Tyra Banks, assisting Tyron Mayes in New York City, to Vivica A Fox, Amber Rose, Rihanna at Gee Jam, and most recently on the Nick Cannon film project King of the Dancehall, which I knew was a pivotal 'get' he was very proud of.

— Fashion designer and events & fashion stylist Kaysian Wilson-Bourke

 

I am grateful to have shared time and space with Dexter. When my children heard of his passing, one of them said, “You have got to be kidding me! You mean Uncle Dexter who always makes us the most beautiful things?” May we always remember the beautiful things you created, your beautiful soul and the beautiful friendship we have shared. Rest well, Dexter!

— JN Foundation Education Programmes Director Dr Renée Rattray

Dexter was abundantly and exceptionally blessed with talents. Amazingly, he unearthed most of them not through formal training but by exploring them through practice. He showed promise in dance during his time with the Stella Maris Dance Ensemble and he even toured with them internationally. Dance freed his spirit and allowed him deep expression that was not always attainable in the noise of daily living. He was a self-taught fashion designer, who honed his god-given talents through practice and learning quickly. He dabbled in many forms of visual arts and prided himself on making personalised gifts such as papier-mâché and painted bottles, which many of his friends continue to treasure. Don't even mention drama, as that was where everything came alive and characters and improvs were moulded to perfection and hilariously presented. Dexter also went on to direct and produce music videos. Notwithstanding the aforementioned endowment of talents, a massive unfolding happened when Dexter came to the realisation that he could combine all those talents and market himself as a stylist. This discovery came to him as enlightenment, and with vision he excitedly carved a commercially viable market space without a local prototype or industry he could easily fit into or follow. Dexter's passion and focus allowed his earnings to grow significantly and allowed him to acquire real estate in his twenties. He was proud of his achievements and remained highly motivated and focused throughout the remainder of his career. Impressively, he always found the time to pull others up behind him and to keep doors he entered open for others to follow.

— Attorney-at-law Duane Thomas

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