Entertainment

Wheel and come again

Robinson urges entertainment sector to organise, approach

BY RICHARD JOHNSON
Observer senior reporter
johnsonr@jamaicaobserver.com

Friday, March 22, 2019

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PLAYERS in the local music industry are being encouraged to formalise themselves and take advantage of global business opportunities facilitated by JAMPRO, the government's investment and promotions agency.

Renee Robinson, film commissioner and manager of Film, Animation and Music at JAMPRO, said there are a number of initiatives being spearheaded by that agency which can benefit the music industry.

“We had to take the decision to prioritise the sectors that are ripe in Jamaica so film, animation and music were the key sectors that were prioritised. What we do for the music industry is a little bit more based on the investment side as opposed to the development side,” she disclosed. “There are several entities in Jamaica that already do address the development of the music industry as well as the way in which that ecosystem functions. So, our role for music is as it relates to investment, is export and trade-related. So, for example if there is a studio that is being built in Jamaica then that infrastructure could be a project that we could help them to move forward.”

Robinson's comments are in contrast to what players in the entertainment fraternity have been saying in the past of not receiving assistance from the government despite pumping much-needed foreign exchange into the economy.

Speaking at the Jamaica Observer's Monday Exchange, Robinson explained that programmes run by JAMPRO such as Export Max can assist players in the music industry but they have to come forward.

Cohorts in this programme participated in business development coaching, productivity audits, trade missions and exhibitions. They also received mentorship from business professionals.

“We do want to ensure that the creative economy companies do not think of themselves as separate and apart from this wave of business development and this wave of global business opportunity that is happening here in Jamaica,” she noted. “They need to ensure formalisation so that they can take advantage of these opportunities. That is what we are focussing on...How do we get some of these companies to engage in more formalised operations so that they can take advantage.”

Renee Robinson, film commissioner and manager of Film, Animation and Music at JAMPRO, said there are a number of initiatives being spearheaded by that agency which can benefit the music industry.

“We had to take the decision to prioritise the sectors that are ripe in Jamaica, so film, animation and music were the key sectors that were prioritised. What we do for the music industry is a little bit more based on the investment side as opposed to the development side,” she disclosed. “There are several entities in Jamaica that already address the development of the music industry as well as the way in which that ecosystem functions. So, our role for music is as it relates to investment, is export and trade-related. So, for example, if there is a studio that is being built in Jamaica then that infrastructure could be a project that we could help them to move forward.”

Robinson's comments are in contrast to what players in the entertainment fraternity have been saying in the past of not receiving assistance from the Government despite pumping much-needed foreign exchange into the economy.

Speaking at the Jamaica Observer's Monday Exchange, Robinson explained that programmes run by JAMPRO, such as Export Max, can assist players in the music industry but they have to come forward.

Cohorts in this programme participated in business development coaching, productivity audits, trade missions and exhibitions. They also received mentorship from business professionals.

“We do want to ensure that the creative economy companies do not think of themselves as separate and apart from this wave of business development and this wave of global business opportunity that is happening here in Jamaica,” she noted. “They need to ensure formalisation so that they can take advantage of these opportunities. That is what we are focussing on...How do we get some of these companies to engage in more formalised operations so that they can take advantage.”


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