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MLK Day marked by Trump criticism, pledges to fight racism

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

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ATLANTA, USA (AP) — Martin Luther King Jr's children and the pastor of an Atlanta church where he preached decried disparaging remarks President Donald Trump is said to have made about African countries, while protests between Haitian immigrants and Trump supporters broke out near the president's Florida resort yesterday, the official federal holiday honouring King.

At gatherings across the nation, activists, residents and teachers honoured the late civil rights leader on what would have been his 89th birthday and ahead of the 50th anniversary of his assassination in Memphis, Tennessee. In Oklahoma, the Cherokee Nation marked Martin Luther King Jr Day with events aimed at coming to terms with its own history of slavery and by welcoming descendants of former slaves into the tribe.

Trump marked his first King holiday as president buffeted by claims that during a meeting with senators on immigration last week, he used a vulgarity to describe African countries and questioned the need to allow more Haitians into the US. He also is said to have asked why the country couldn't have more immigrants from nations like Norway.

In Washington, King's eldest son, Martin Luther King III, criticised Trump, saying, “When a president insists that our nation needs more citizens from white states like Norway, I don't even think we need to spend any time even talking about what it says and what it is“.

He added: “We got to find a way to work on this man's heart.”

In Atlanta, King's daughter, the Rev Bernice King, told hundreds of people who packed the pews of the Ebenezer Baptist Church that they “cannot allow the nations of the world to embrace the words that come from our president as a reflection of the true spirit of America.

“We are one people, one nation, one blood, one destiny. ... All of civilisation and humanity originated from the soils of Africa,” Bernice King said. “Our collective voice in this hour must always be louder than the one who sometimes does not reflect the legacy of my father.”

Church pastor the Rev Raphael Warnock also took issue with Trump's campaign slogan to “Make America Great Again”.

Warnock said he thinks America “is already great ... in large measure because of Africa and African people”.

Down the street from Trump's Mar-a-Lago retreat in Palm Beach, Florida, yesterday, Haitian protesters and Trump supporters yelled at each other from opposing corners. Trump was staying at the resort for the Martin Luther King Jr holiday weekend. Video footage posted by WPEC-TV showed several hundred pro-Haiti demonstrators yelling from one side of the street Monday while waving Haitian flags. The Haitians and their supporters shouted “Our country is not a sh..hole,” referring to comments the president reportedly made. Trump has said that is not the language he used.

The smaller pro-Trump contingent waved American flags and campaign posters and yelled, “Trump is making America great again.” One man could be seen telling the Haitians to leave the country. Police kept the sides apart.

Trump dedicated his weekly address to the nation, released yesterday, to King.

“Dr King's dream is our dream, it is the American dream. It's the promise stitched into the fabric of our nation, etched into the hearts of our people and written into the soul of humankind,” he said in the address, which he tweeted to his followers. “It is the dream of a world where people are judged by who they are, not how they look or where they come from.”

The Cherokee Nation tribe — one of the country's largest — marked the King holiday on with calls to service and by confronting its slave-owning past. A federal court ruled last year that the descendants of former slaves, known as Freedmen, had the same rights to tribal citizenship, voting, health care and housing as bloodline Cherokees.

“The time is now to deal with it and talk about it,” said Cherokee Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. “It's been a positive thing for our country to reconcile that during Dr King's era, and it's going to be a positive thing for Cherokees to talk about that history as part of reconciling our history with slavery.”

One descendant of Freedmen, Rodslen Brown-King, said her mother was able to vote as a Cherokee for the first and only time recently. Other relatives died before getting the benefits that come with tribal citizenship, including a 34-year-old nephew with stomach cancer, she said.

“He was waiting on this decision,” said Brown-King of Fort Gibson, Oklahoma. “It's just a lot of struggle, a lot of up and down trauma in our lives. It's exciting to know we are coming together and moving forward in this.”

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